July 26, 2003
RE: THE_OPERATION

Based on a set of digital drawings (transformed into desktop replacement icons) depicting George W. Bush's administration as wounded soldiers in the war against terrorism, RE:THE_OPERATION explores the sexual and philosophical dynamics of war through the lives of the members as they physically engage each other and the "enemy".

Letters, notes, and digital snapshots "produced" by the members on their tour of duty become the basis of video portraits that articulate the neuroses and obsessions compelling them toward an infinite war.

Part A-Team, part philosophical meditation, with a dose of character assassination, RE:THE_OPERATION exists as a video and a set of desktop replacement icons for MAC and WIN.

tom.gif

RE:THE_OPERATION

[You might want to skip the icons, which I can't get to download properly, and go straight to the videos, which are fascinating.]

Posted by Brian Stefans at July 26, 2003 09:15 AM | TrackBack
Comments

I like your style

Posted by: Marck on November 27, 2003 04:33 AM

Inside each stack frame is a slew of useful information. It tells the computer what code is currently executing, where to go next, where to go in the case a return statement is found, and a whole lot of other things that are incredible useful to the computer, but not very useful to you most of the time. One of the things that is useful to you is the part of the frame that keeps track of all the variables you're using. So the first place for a variable to live is on the Stack. This is a very nice place to live, in that all the creation and destruction of space is handled for you as Stack Frames are created and destroyed. You seldom have to worry about making space for the variables on the stack. The only problem is that the variables here only live as long as the stack frame does, which is to say the length of the function those variables are declared in. This is often a fine situation, but when you need to store information for longer than a single function, you are instantly out of luck.

Posted by: Warham on January 19, 2004 04:37 AM

But variables get one benefit people do not

Posted by: Archilai on January 19, 2004 04:37 AM

Let's see an example by converting our favoriteNumber variable from a stack variable to a heap variable. The first thing we'll do is find the project we've been working on and open it up in Project Builder. In the file, we'll start right at the top and work our way down. Under the line:

Posted by: Josias on January 19, 2004 04:38 AM

Let's see an example by converting our favoriteNumber variable from a stack variable to a heap variable. The first thing we'll do is find the project we've been working on and open it up in Project Builder. In the file, we'll start right at the top and work our way down. Under the line:

Posted by: Rawsone on January 19, 2004 04:38 AM

These secret identities serve a variety of purposes, and they help us to understand how variables work. In this lesson, we'll be writing a little less code than we've done in previous articles, but we'll be taking a detailed look at how variables live and work.

Posted by: Ebulus on January 19, 2004 04:39 AM
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